The name Ports 1961 brings visions of yachting along the Mediterranean, stark-white from head-to-toe and sailor-style navy and stripes. While this isn’t quite the Ports 1961 aesthetic, we were pleased to note that Milan Vukmirovic did add a dash of stripes to his Fall/Winter 2017/18 collection — though that’s where the boating vibes end. Instead, the collection features urban contemporary styles with an underlying European fit and Asia/European tone.

We see some stripes from Ports 1961,but we aren't getting a beachy vibe here. Thank goodness for autumn.

We see some stripes from Ports 1961,but we aren’t getting a beachy vibe here. Thank goodness for autumn.

The designer co-founded the legendary concept store Colette, which is closing its doors December 20, 2017 to the dismay of fashionistas around the world. We could harp on this sad occurrence all day, but we won’t, because focusing on the Ports 1961 Fall collection makes us much happier.

Some Asian influence, along with Parisian amour.

Some Asian influence, along with Parisian amour.

Ports 1961 really went visceral with the colorblocking trend this season, covering sweaters and shirts with large sections of contrasting tones. We get a flash of pastel and white here too — don’t forget winter white is still a thing and the Labor Day white rule goes out the door when you exit the good ol’ US of A. So feel free to sport your winter white with pride all over Europe, Asia and beyond this fall and winter.

You can still wear a little white in the winter.

You can still wear a little white in the winter.

A rather literal colorblocking situation.

A rather literal colorblocking situation.

It wouldn’t be fall without a dash of layering, and Ports 1961 goes more formal with a open-cut style sleeve cape over a colorblocked, partially unbuttoned shirt. The contrasting formal style juxtaposes perfectly with the more casual baggy trousers and unbuttoned, untucked shirt, still crisply ironed, of course.

Layers galore.

Layers galore.

Words by Lori Zaino and photos from Ports 1961.

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